Beeswax Candle

Have you ever made your own candle? Turns out it's super easy if you've got the right materials. The inspiration for this project came from my younger sister's pottery work that you may remember seeing HERE. The piece she made reminded me of a beehive, so I came up with a way to make it seem even more like one. And I did so by using beeswax of course! 


First stop, Utrecht Art Supplies on Mass Ave in Boston. The people working here were very friendly and happy to help! 


I bought a 1 pound block of Jacquard Beeswax for $12. Not too shabby. And as a bonus, it already smells like honey, so it really goes with my bee theme!


The other supplies I needed were candle wicks, Krazy glue, crayons, and a mason jar. 


I opted for wood wicks because I love the crackling sound they make when they burn. All you have to do is place the wick in the metal clasp then trim the wood to the size you want it. Superglue the bottom of the clasp then attach it to the bottom of your candle jar. Obviously I'm using Carolyn's pottery piece for my jar, but a mason jar could be a great substitute. 



Next you have to prepare the wax. Start by cutting the block into smaller pieces.

   
Put the pieces in a jar that you don't mind ruining because it's going to end up covered in wax. I used a mason jar which worked out well. 

  
Boil water in a pot and then place your jar with the wax into the water to create a double boiler. You're going to want to keep an eye on the wax the whole time it's melting because word on the street is beeswax can be highly flammable. 


If you want to add some color to your wax, just add some crayons to the mix! I wanted my wax to be really yellow so that it would look like honey so I just added 2 yellow crayons. Keep the temperature on high until the wax melts all the way. This took about half an hour. 
     

   
Once the wax is melted, stir it a little to make the color consistent then turn the heat off and pour the melted wax into your jar - or beehive pottery!


Let the wax cool until it's hardened and then your candle is ready to use!


UPDATE: It has been brought to my attention that wood wick candles don't tend to work well with beeswax. So if you want to use beeswax make sure to use a regular wick, or if you want to use a wood wick you should use different candle wax.

        

10 comments:

  1. I love this! It's perfect in that candle holder, too. :)

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  2. This was handy. I've been making beeswax candles all year now, but I had bought a bag of wooden wicks off ebay and wanted to try them. All the info I read said they wouldn't work well with beeswax. But yours seemed to be just fine! Question tho, there seems to a be a science regarding the size wick for the size circumference of the candle. I make standing pillars normally. How big was the circumference of the pottery piece? Did it burn straight down or did it it leave some wax up the sides?

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    1. Hi! I'm so glad you left this comment. I actually noticed that when I light this candle, the flame doesn't last very long. I had no idea that it was because of the beeswax. I think after hearing what you've said, I would suggest using a regular wick instead of a wood wick just to be safe. I'm going to add this information to my post to make my other readers aware as well. I hope you're able to put your wooden wicks to good use!

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  3. I do remember seeing stats: wick size for dif sizes and shapes of candles. That is 50 year old knowledge so I'll leave the archeology to you. fun site!

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    1. Thanks Teres, I'll take all the knowledge I can get! And thank you for stopping by :)

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  4. Thanks for all this info.. I am a beginner at this hobby and I appreciate your input here about the use of beeswax and the wicks used..Very informative!

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    1. I'm so glad you found this information to be helpful! Good luck with your new hobby!!!

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  5. This is so cute! I recently learned how to make soy wax candles, but have never worked with beeswax. Love the tip about the crayons!

    In my experience, wood wicks are kind of weird... But I DID figure out that you're supposed to "double" your wicks if they didn't come doubled already. I don't know why, but it definitely burned better when I did that. Don't know if that would help or not!

    Just found your blog and am loving it! :)

    xoMonica

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    1. Aww thank you Monica!! I'm so glad you found me! And thank you for the extra info about the wood wick candles. I'm not a pro candle maker so I really appreciate this feedback and I'm sure my readers do too. I had never heard about doubling the wicks but I'm definitely going to try it next time! Happy Crafting :)

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